Program Schedule

CHAA Program for the September 2017 through May 2018 season to date.

Please join us for an enlightening and entertaining series of talks.  Light refreshments will be served after each program…of course!

Sunday, September 17, 2017, 3:00 – 5:00 p.m., Ann Arbor District Library – Malletts Creek Branch, 3090 E. Eisenhower Parkway (east of Stone School Road), Ann Arbor, MI 48108 
Our Bodies Tell Our Histories:  Recovering Land, Life and Foodways in Native America.  Shiloh Maples, SNAP-Ed & BALAC Grant Program Coordinator of American Indian Health and Family Services of Southeastern Michigan, returns to present the first program in the 2017-2018 season.  Shiloh opened the 2016-2017 season and is back by popular demand.  She will present on access to traditional foods and relationship to ancestral homelands — these are essential to the overall well-being of Native American communities.  Come learn about the historical challenges to maintaining indigenous food sovereignty and its impact on Native health, and the emerging movement to preserve and revitalize traditional foodways. 

Sunday, October 15, 2017, 4:00 – 6:00 p.m., Ann Arbor District Library – Malletts Creek Branch, 3090 E. Eisenhower Parkway (east of Stone School Road), Ann Arbor, MI 48108
***NOTE TIME:  4:00 – 6:00 P.M.
Discriminating Taste:  How Class Anxiety Created the American Food Revolution
A provocative look at contemporary food culture, Discriminating Taste critically examines cultural touchstones from Ratatouille to The Biggest Loser, identifying how “good food” is conflated with high status.  Margot Finn, Ph.D. and Lecturer, University Courses Division at the University of Michigan, argues that the rise of gourmet, ethnic, diet and organic foods must be understood in tandem with the ever-widening income inequality gap.

Sunday, November 12, 2017, 2:00 – 5:00 p.m., Detroit Institute of Arts, 5200 Woodward Avenue, Detroit MI  48202

***NOTE VENUE:  DETROIT INSTITUTE OF ARTS *** Meet at 1:45 p.m. at the Group Entrance to the museum (on John R Street)

The Dutch Table:  Food and Drink in the Dutch Golden Age

A private tour through the Dutch Galleries at the DIA will be a very special treat for Culinary Historians members. Dr. Yao-Fen You, Associate Curator of European Sculpture and Decorative Arts, will tour and describe in depth the foodstuffs represented in 17C Dutch still lives and other genre scenes.  Dr. You will highlight the Golden Age in Dutch art, the period when arguably the greatest still lives in art history depicted the extraordinary place food holds in visual culture. Please join us for our second field trip to the DIA and a custom tour by Dr. You! Parking is $7.00 in the lot across from the DIA, and admission is $12.00 per person (DIA members free).

Sunday, December 10, 2017, Themed Meal for CHAA members and friends.

Sunday, January 21, 2018, 3:00 – 5:00 p.m., Ann Arbor District Library – Malletts Creek Branch, 3090 E. Eisenhower Parkway (east of Stone School Road), Ann Arbor, MI 48108

Hot from the oven:  Zingerman’s Bakehouse Cookbook!

Kick off the new year right with Amy Emberling and Frank Carollo, Managing Partners of Zingerman’s Bakehouse, as they introduce their first-ever cookbook, which features all the recipes of the Bakehouse’s most popular items. Also included are recipes that are unique to Michigan, along with Frank and Amy’s personal favorites. They’ve also added essays and brief stories for context, to give readers a sense of how the Zingerman’s community works together to produce great food. Copies of the cookbook will be available for purchase. And if you’ve received the book as a holiday gift, bring it along!


Sunday, February 18, 2018, 3:00 – 5:00 p.m., Ann Arbor District Library – Malletts Creek Branch, 3090 E. Eisenhower Parkway (east of Stone School Road), Ann Arbor, MI 48108

Small Appetites: A History of Children’s Food

Have a picky eater in your family? Helen Zoe Veit, associate professor of history at Michigan State University, returns to share findings from her latest book (in progress). Small Appetites traces changes in children’s eating and changing beliefs about children’s eating from the early nineteenth century through the end of the twentieth century, a time when childhood itself was undergoing revolutionary changes. Today many Americans assume that children are naturally picky eaters. Yet for all their ubiquity today, picky eaters were rare in earlier times. In fact, many of our most basic beliefs about children’s eating are unprecedented. The question of what children can or can’t “naturally” eat falls at the intersection of biology and culture, and at the intersection of cultural history and the history of science.

Sunday, March 18, 2018,  3:00 – 5:00 p.m., Ann Arbor District Library – Malletts Creek Branch, 3090 E. Eisenhower Parkway (east of Stone School Road), Ann Arbor, MI 48108

Honey Bee Health: How it Affects Us and What We Can Do

Local beekeeper and educator Jamie Berlin returns to update us on how honey bee health decline affects humans, and what is at stake for impacts on global food production, healthy ecosystems and the economy. Honey bees play a foundational role in our food value chain. Learn why we need to save bees, about the factors that affect bee health and how local actions in Ypsilanti — Michigan’s first Bee City — are contributing to halting the decline in the global bee population.

Sunday, April 25, 2018,  3:00 – 5:00 p.m., Ann Arbor District Library – Malletts Creek Branch, 3090 E. Eisenhower Parkway (east of Stone School Road), Ann Arbor, MI 48108
Program to be announced.

Sunday, May 20, 2017, 3:00 – 5:00 p.m., Ann Arbor District Library – Malletts Creek Branch, 3090 E. Eisenhower Parkway (east of Stone School Road), Ann Arbor, MI 48108

Farm Meals Mentioned in Ypsilanti Farm Diaries

The stories and recollections of Washtenaw County farm women held by the Ypsilanti Historical Society provide a record of daily life in the 19th and 20th centuries.  Local author and historian Laura Bien presents research on handwritten diaries that reflect in their own words the everyday work farm women performed:  gardening, harvesting, butchering, processing, preserving and cooking food for their families, supplementing the family income through the sale of eggs and produce, adapting to technological changes, and organizing work at the homestead. Laura Bien’s talk will be the jumping off point for our Summer Picnic theme: an authentic seasonal farm meal from the 1800’s. She will provide a bibliography of sources of historic local recipes we’ll use to prepare this annual shared potluck — always a highlight of the summer!

 

 

 

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